Bell Pepper

Bell Pepper

About

The bell pepper is a cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum. Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colors, including red, yellow, orange, green, chocolate/brown, vanilla/white, and purple. Bell peppers are sometimes grouped with less pungent pepper varieties as "sweet peppers". The whitish ribs and seeds inside bell peppers may be consumed, but some people find the taste to be bitter.
Today, China is the world's largest pepper producer, followed by Mexico and Indonesia. Ideal growing conditions for bell peppers include warm soil, ideally 70 to 84°F, that is kept moist but not waterlogged. Bell peppers are sensitive to an abundance of moisture and extreme temperatures.

Grown In Mexico, Central America, and South America

Scoville Heat Rating:
0-25 SHU

Recipes Using Bell Peppers

Chili Pepper

Chili Pepper

About

The chili pepper (also chile pepper chilli pepper, or simply chilli, from Nahuatl chīlli Nahuatl pronunciation: is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. They are widely used in many cuisines to add spiciness to dishes. The substances that give chili peppers their intensity when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin and related compounds known as capsaicinoids.
Chili peppers originated in Mexico. After the Columbian Exchange, many cultivars of chili pepper spread across the world, used for both food and traditional medicine.
Worldwide in 2014, 32.3 million tonnes of green chili peppers and 3.8 million tonnes of dried chili peppers were produced. China is the world's largest producer of green chillies, providing half of the global total.

Grown In Mexico

Scoville Heat Rating:
0-7,000 SHU

Recipes Using Chili Peppers

Poblano Pepper

Poblano Pepper

About

The poblano (Capsicum annuum) is a mild chili pepper originating in the state of Puebla, Mexico. Dried, it is called ancho or chile ancho, from the Mexican Spanish name ancho ("wide") or chile ancho ("wide chile"). Stuffed fresh and roasted it is popular in chile rellenos poblanos.
While poblanos tend to have a mild flavor, occasionally and unpredictably they can have significant heat. Different peppers from the same plant have been reported to vary substantially in heat intensity. The ripened red poblano is significantly hotter and more flavorful than the less ripe, green poblano. A closely related variety is the mulato, which is darker in color, sweeter in flavor, and softer in texture.

Grown In Puabla, Mexico

Scoville Heat Rating:
1,000-1,500 SHU

Recipes Using Poblano Peppers

Jalepeño Pepper

Jalepeño Pepper

About

The jalapeño is a medium-sized chili pepper pod type cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum. A mature jalapeño fruit is 5–10 cm (2–4 in) long and hangs down with a round, firm, smooth flesh of 25–38 mm (1–1 in) wide. Depending on cultivar, it can have a wide range of pungency, with Scoville heat units of a few thousand to as high as 462,884 (Chiltepín cultivar). Commonly picked and consumed while still green, it is occasionally allowed to fully ripen and turn red, orange, or yellow. It is wider and generally milder than the similar Serrano pepper. The Chile Pepper Institute is known for developing colored variations.

Grown In Mexico

Scoville Heat Rating:
3,500-10,000 SHU

Recipes Using Jalepeño Peppers

Banana Pepper

Banana Pepper

About

The banana pepper (also known as the yellow wax pepper or banana chili) is a medium-sized member of the chili pepper family that has a mild, tangy taste. While typically bright yellow, it is possible for them to change to green, red, or orange as they ripen. It is often pickled, stuffed or used as a raw ingredient in foods. It is a cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum. Its flavor is not very hot (0–500 Scoville units) and, as is the case with most peppers, its heat depends on the maturity of the pepper, with the ripest being sweeter than younger ones.

Grown In warm, moderate climates

Scoville Heat Rating:
0-500 SHU

Recipes Using Banana Peppers